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Yourcodenameis:Milo - They Came From The Sun

This second official album for yourcodenamis:milo follows last year's 'Print Is Dead' (a collaboration with talented artists as varied as Tom Vek and Lethal Bizzle), dividing their time between this brilliant idea and recording 'They Came From The Sun' in their own studio. The best thing about a band this original is that their new album can bear a marked difference to what has come before, yet still remain utterly recognizable as the same band. This album includes their catchiest material - were this any other intelligent band presenting a new sense of accessibility, many would claim a betrayal of principles - but this isn't any other band.

'They Came From The Sun' is an album that not only deserves to win them a horde of new fans, but that is so good it will keep any of the more pretentious musos from having chest pains at the mention of the dreaded 'accessible' word. The riff from opener 'Pacific Theatre' could soundtrack grand prix adverts, sounding upbeat but defiant, and we defy crowds not to lose all control during the soaring "it's over to you!" and breakdowns. 'All That Was Missing' has been kicking around a while, and it's changed over the months, but remains an excellent example of ycni:m at their best; lilting harmonies with a raw edge, it draws on a number of ideas without cluttering and results in one of their finest tracks. And then we have 'Understand' – an unbelievably good choice for single, it will stick in your head all day, instant and catchy whilst dodging easy genre classification. Possibly their finest moment.

Elsewhere they employ different tactics, sounds and ideas; from the slower, dreamy 'sixfive', to the excellent electro-tinted 'About Leaving'. And during 'I'm Impressed' they utilize a frankly bonkers sound that gives the impression they borrowed some medieval minstrel to pluck amongst the pulsing throb laid down by Shaun Abbot and Ross Harley's drumming and bass. 'Evening' has something of Radiohead's 'I Might Be Wrong' about parts of it – before it becomes a huge rock monster. And 'Translate' mixes in driving snare and kick drum with much slower vocals and layering with intermittent bursts of raw riffing, but around two minutes in it transforms into one of the most body moving, head-nodding riffs you've ever experienced - and heavier than a lead elephant. Sure to be a live favourite.

The strangest move by the band – short instrumental 'Dicta Boelcke' – is a perfect mid-album interlude track that follows a fantastic album closer in 'Screaming Ground'. But yourcodenameis:milo have rarely done what you would expect. It's part of what makes them one of the best things to happen to British music in years. 'They Came From The Sun' is laden with ideas, but more so than 'Ignoto', ycni:m have produced an album that will appeal to everyone from those that automatically dislike commerciality, to those who only consume it, and everyone inbetween. They've laid out their diverse talent, and now it's over to us.Phillip May

Released 1 Jan 1970 // // Rating:

****

/5
Yourcodenameis:Milo - They Came From The Sun

This second official album for yourcodenamis:milo follows last year's 'Print Is Dead' (a collaboration with talented artists as varied as Tom Vek and Lethal Bizzle), dividing their time between this brilliant idea and recording 'They Came From The Sun' in their own studio. The best thing about a band this original is that their new album can bear a marked difference to what has come before, yet still remain utterly recognizable as the same band. This album includes their catchiest material - were this any other intelligent band presenting a new sense of accessibility, many would claim a betrayal of principles - but this isn't any other band.

'They Came From The Sun' is an album that not only deserves to win them a horde of new fans, but that is so good it will keep any of the more pretentious musos from having chest pains at the mention of the dreaded 'accessible' word. The riff from opener 'Pacific Theatre' could soundtrack grand prix adverts, sounding upbeat but defiant, and we defy crowds not to lose all control during the soaring "it's over to you!" and breakdowns. 'All That Was Missing' has been kicking around a while, and it's changed over the months, but remains an excellent example of ycni:m at their best; lilting harmonies with a raw edge, it draws on a number of ideas without cluttering and results in one of their finest tracks. And then we have 'Understand' – an unbelievably good choice for single, it will stick in your head all day, instant and catchy whilst dodging easy genre classification. Possibly their finest moment.

Elsewhere they employ different tactics, sounds and ideas; from the slower, dreamy 'sixfive', to the excellent electro-tinted 'About Leaving'. And during 'I'm Impressed' they utilize a frankly bonkers sound that gives the impression they borrowed some medieval minstrel to pluck amongst the pulsing throb laid down by Shaun Abbot and Ross Harley's drumming and bass. 'Evening' has something of Radiohead's 'I Might Be Wrong' about parts of it – before it becomes a huge rock monster. And 'Translate' mixes in driving snare and kick drum with much slower vocals and layering with intermittent bursts of raw riffing, but around two minutes in it transforms into one of the most body moving, head-nodding riffs you've ever experienced - and heavier than a lead elephant. Sure to be a live favourite.

The strangest move by the band – short instrumental 'Dicta Boelcke' – is a perfect mid-album interlude track that follows a fantastic album closer in 'Screaming Ground'. But yourcodenameis:milo have rarely done what you would expect. It's part of what makes them one of the best things to happen to British music in years. 'They Came From The Sun' is laden with ideas, but more so than 'Ignoto', ycni:m have produced an album that will appeal to everyone from those that automatically dislike commerciality, to those who only consume it, and everyone inbetween. They've laid out their diverse talent, and now it's over to us.Phillip May