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Supergrass - Diamond Hoo Ha

Theyve come a long way since then, but its often hard to remember Supergrass for anything other than the aural abomination that is Alright. This can be quite unfair, as its always worth remembering they created the fantastic Richard III, so though theyve never re-attained the heights they climbed with that terrible song, you can be reassured theyve never made anything so bad since.

This, their sixth album, is a storage room of references and influences that still remains very much Supergrass. Opener and lead single Diamond Hoo Ha Man has an occasionally resurfacing element of White Stripes to its simplistic, fuzzed party-blues, even Coombes vocals get a little Jack White. Bad Blood gives an Iggy And The Stooges stomp and the good-time vibe used so effectively by The Hoosiers is all over the place. Elsewhere the corners are shaded with a little Jon Spencer Blues Explosion menace here and some Bowie there, and even... some Supergrass from ten years ago – on the party-starting romp and album highlight Whiskey & Green Tea.

There are some tired moments, Rough Knuckles and the dull summer-festival track Ghost Of A Friend are a little too uneventful to keep your attention, but for all the reference-points, they are very much their own band, and Supergrass have a re-kindled fire on this album that more than justifies their continued existence, and almost – almost – makes up for Alright.Phillip May

Released 1 Jan 1970 // // Rating:

***

/5
Supergrass - Diamond Hoo Ha

Theyve come a long way since then, but its often hard to remember Supergrass for anything other than the aural abomination that is Alright. This can be quite unfair, as its always worth remembering they created the fantastic Richard III, so though theyve never re-attained the heights they climbed with that terrible song, you can be reassured theyve never made anything so bad since.

This, their sixth album, is a storage room of references and influences that still remains very much Supergrass. Opener and lead single Diamond Hoo Ha Man has an occasionally resurfacing element of White Stripes to its simplistic, fuzzed party-blues, even Coombes vocals get a little Jack White. Bad Blood gives an Iggy And The Stooges stomp and the good-time vibe used so effectively by The Hoosiers is all over the place. Elsewhere the corners are shaded with a little Jon Spencer Blues Explosion menace here and some Bowie there, and even... some Supergrass from ten years ago – on the party-starting romp and album highlight Whiskey & Green Tea.

There are some tired moments, Rough Knuckles and the dull summer-festival track Ghost Of A Friend are a little too uneventful to keep your attention, but for all the reference-points, they are very much their own band, and Supergrass have a re-kindled fire on this album that more than justifies their continued existence, and almost – almost – makes up for Alright.Phillip May