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Simian Mobile Disco - Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release

Remember that Peugeot ad with the song 'La Breeze'? All those cartoon things jumping out to show the Peugeot 1007 will be useful if you get attacked by giant 2-D spiders? Well that was Simian. Two of them split and formed Simian Mobile Disco. One half of the duo is James Ellis Ford, who produced the Klaxons and Arctic Monkeys first albums, and they're here to educate the 'new rave' generation on the dance music that is its distant relative. With their indie credentials, SMD are the latest to target this marketable resource of dance-happy indie kids, having already remixed the aforementioned bands and The Go! Team whilst DJ-ing around the country.

Anyone expecting the indie with dance elements of the Klaxons and their ilk to be reversed will be mistaken, as this is basically a funky acid house album; Meshing electro with sounds similar to Daft Punk ('Got This Down') with the odd elements of Royksopp ('Wooden') and, er, 70s Sci-fi soundtracks ('Scott'). So having established its vast distance from the poorly dubbed 'new rave', it's a shame that this just isn't a very good album. For the most part, above average dance music is ruined by unnecessary and irritating MC-work. Witness the quality of 'It's The Beat's body-moving rhythms marred by the pointless vocals (Ninja from the excellent Go! Team), or the musical abomination that is 'Hot Dog'.

It's not all bad; opener 'Sleep Deprivation' is impressive, almost trancier moments with quality build-ups and releases, and 'Tits and Acid' manages to be infectious and surprisingly unpredictable for a dance track. 'Love' proves most surprising of all, containing a bass sound not heard since boy band Five's seminal work 'Slam Dunk The Funk' with some 80s layering - and yet manages to be a cracking track.

With a absence of guitars or remotely worthwhile lyrical content, this is a bizarre record to be marketed towards indie kids, and the press release's constant use of the word 'rave' is odd as this contains not a single element of rave music - but then when Klaxons themselves seem exasperated at their joke becoming a ludicrous new genre pigeonhole, it's clear to see this is going to be snapped up by those more interested in the names involved than the music they make.Phillip May

Released 1 Jan 1970 // // Rating:

***

/5
Simian Mobile Disco - Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release

Remember that Peugeot ad with the song 'La Breeze'? All those cartoon things jumping out to show the Peugeot 1007 will be useful if you get attacked by giant 2-D spiders? Well that was Simian. Two of them split and formed Simian Mobile Disco. One half of the duo is James Ellis Ford, who produced the Klaxons and Arctic Monkeys first albums, and they're here to educate the 'new rave' generation on the dance music that is its distant relative. With their indie credentials, SMD are the latest to target this marketable resource of dance-happy indie kids, having already remixed the aforementioned bands and The Go! Team whilst DJ-ing around the country.

Anyone expecting the indie with dance elements of the Klaxons and their ilk to be reversed will be mistaken, as this is basically a funky acid house album; Meshing electro with sounds similar to Daft Punk ('Got This Down') with the odd elements of Royksopp ('Wooden') and, er, 70s Sci-fi soundtracks ('Scott'). So having established its vast distance from the poorly dubbed 'new rave', it's a shame that this just isn't a very good album. For the most part, above average dance music is ruined by unnecessary and irritating MC-work. Witness the quality of 'It's The Beat's body-moving rhythms marred by the pointless vocals (Ninja from the excellent Go! Team), or the musical abomination that is 'Hot Dog'.

It's not all bad; opener 'Sleep Deprivation' is impressive, almost trancier moments with quality build-ups and releases, and 'Tits and Acid' manages to be infectious and surprisingly unpredictable for a dance track. 'Love' proves most surprising of all, containing a bass sound not heard since boy band Five's seminal work 'Slam Dunk The Funk' with some 80s layering - and yet manages to be a cracking track.

With a absence of guitars or remotely worthwhile lyrical content, this is a bizarre record to be marketed towards indie kids, and the press release's constant use of the word 'rave' is odd as this contains not a single element of rave music - but then when Klaxons themselves seem exasperated at their joke becoming a ludicrous new genre pigeonhole, it's clear to see this is going to be snapped up by those more interested in the names involved than the music they make.Phillip May