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Los Campesinos! - Hold On Now, Youngster

A few tentative and ungainly guitar strums usher in the fervent bounce of Death To Los Campesinos!, springing to life and rarely relinquishing across their début, 'Hold On Now, Youngster'. Filled with a boundless energy, these youngsters do anything but hold on as they race into one of the album highlights, Broken Heartbeats Sound Like Breakbeats, a perfect example of their intelligent lyricism and knack for adding a lot to the music – but never too much. All manner of instruments are used with that special kind of precision that appears pleasingly random, well employed synth avoids any trace of nu-rave connection but similarly gets your feet moving uncontrollably towards the dance floor.

Encased with a feel-good vibe to the music only matched by The Go! Team, its nice to have an indie band everyones excited about that dont seem like they sleep at night stroking an autographed photo of Morrissey, and a band whose dodgy vocals dont seem like a gimmick. That said, there are a number of moments it gets a bit too harsh, the excruciating shitness of Dont Tell Me To Do The Math(s) in particular is so tuneless its immeasurably out of place on this record. And as good as the lyrics are, its not consistent, often flowing from pretentious (see also: eighteen word titles), to sixth form tortured romantic syndrome “And when our eyes meet, all that I can read, is you're the b-side.”

But this is a first album; theyre youngsters (who definitely dont intend to Hold On Now) and theyre already blessed with a fantastic ability for crafting immediate, urgent, accessible indie that is made to be good rather than made to be cool. Rarely is a song made about dancing- for dancing not a throwaway snack, here, You! Me! Dance! Is as fun as its overused exclamation marks, and glorious album closer 2007, The Year That Punk Rock Broke (My Heart) may not be as good as Arcade Fire, but shares a mutual love for building things up to a deafening, glorious, crescendo of a finale. Theres more potential here than indie music has seen in some time, and theyre swiftly becoming the name on everyones lips, but theres a danger here for Los Campesinos! - While a lot of what they stand for goes against the current indie buzz-trends, theres every likelihood that theyll become the next one.Phillip May

Released 1 Jan 1970 // // Rating:

****

/5
Los Campesinos! - Hold On Now, Youngster

A few tentative and ungainly guitar strums usher in the fervent bounce of Death To Los Campesinos!, springing to life and rarely relinquishing across their début, 'Hold On Now, Youngster'. Filled with a boundless energy, these youngsters do anything but hold on as they race into one of the album highlights, Broken Heartbeats Sound Like Breakbeats, a perfect example of their intelligent lyricism and knack for adding a lot to the music – but never too much. All manner of instruments are used with that special kind of precision that appears pleasingly random, well employed synth avoids any trace of nu-rave connection but similarly gets your feet moving uncontrollably towards the dance floor.

Encased with a feel-good vibe to the music only matched by The Go! Team, its nice to have an indie band everyones excited about that dont seem like they sleep at night stroking an autographed photo of Morrissey, and a band whose dodgy vocals dont seem like a gimmick. That said, there are a number of moments it gets a bit too harsh, the excruciating shitness of Dont Tell Me To Do The Math(s) in particular is so tuneless its immeasurably out of place on this record. And as good as the lyrics are, its not consistent, often flowing from pretentious (see also: eighteen word titles), to sixth form tortured romantic syndrome “And when our eyes meet, all that I can read, is you're the b-side.”

But this is a first album; theyre youngsters (who definitely dont intend to Hold On Now) and theyre already blessed with a fantastic ability for crafting immediate, urgent, accessible indie that is made to be good rather than made to be cool. Rarely is a song made about dancing- for dancing not a throwaway snack, here, You! Me! Dance! Is as fun as its overused exclamation marks, and glorious album closer 2007, The Year That Punk Rock Broke (My Heart) may not be as good as Arcade Fire, but shares a mutual love for building things up to a deafening, glorious, crescendo of a finale. Theres more potential here than indie music has seen in some time, and theyre swiftly becoming the name on everyones lips, but theres a danger here for Los Campesinos! - While a lot of what they stand for goes against the current indie buzz-trends, theres every likelihood that theyll become the next one.Phillip May